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Barred from feeding homeless , food not prepared in a certified kitchen - Right b/c garbage can is better. Link #cot 1347 days ago

RT @Boomerjeff: YOu'd never know it from listening to Obama but 7 of the top ten tax revenue years came AFTER the Bush tax cuts http://b ... 1393 days ago

Obama cowers in the face of a guys who sleeps on friends couches. Link #tcot #hhrs #p2 #teaparty #wikileaks 1393 days ago

"Schwarzenegger decriminalizes marijuana possession in CA.." There goes the last shred of productivity CA had. #tcot #hhrs #sgp #rs 1452 days ago

Corrupt Federal Prosecutors - the bigger gov. grows, the more we'll see. Link #tcot #tlot #teaparty #hhrs #sgp 1455 days ago

Why Islamic moderates are so scarce Link #tcot #hhrs #sgp #rs 1480 days ago

Rahm Emanuel's Desktop...Just Briliant. Link #tcot #hhrs #sgp #rs #olo #teaparty #p2 1481 days ago

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An Announcement From OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Episode Description
An Announcement From OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Investor's Business Daily | Fri Aug, 10 | Share

Business Fears The Obama Cliff, Not the Fiscal Cliff 8.6.12

Episode Description
Economy: The New York Times says businesses are cutting back because of the "fiscal cliff" of spending cuts and tax hikes that'll kick in should Congress remain gridlocked. But what worries businesses more is the Obama Cliff. As the election gets closer, more and more news outlets are picking up on the theme that a political impasse in Washington is the biggest risk to the economy because it will result in huge tax hikes and spending cuts next year. As the Times put it, a "rising number of manufacturers are canceling new investments and putting off new hires because they fear paralysis in Washington." There's no doubt that inaction means trouble. Unless Congress does something, all the Bush tax cuts will expire, boosting taxes by $221 billion next year alone. And, as we've pointed out, the scheduled automatic defense cuts threaten our national security capabilities, to say nothing of DOD contractor jobs. But the gridlock theme also just happens to suit Obama's political interest, letting him blame Republicans for any bad economic news before the election. So let's be clear about who's really to blame for this predicament. Republicans simply want to extend all Bush tax cuts for a year, a position shared by several Democrats, including Bill Clinton before Obama forced him to repent. Obama himself once said that the worst time to raise taxes is in a bad economy. Yet Obama has now expressly promised to let taxes go up on everyone if he can't get them raised on the "rich." And Democrats show an increased willingness to hold a gun to the economy's head if they can't force Republicans to play their class warfare games. by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

Chick-fil-A "Kiss-In" Nothing But A Three-Ring Media Circus 8.6.12

Episode Description
Media Bias: What if they gave a news event and no one came? That's the story of the Chick-fil-A "Kiss-In" called by gay rights activists and copiously covered by the press. The real story is how the media played it up. In a dishonest bid to discredit the authentic display of national unity Aug. 1 over free-speech rights at Chick-fil-A, a fast-food chain whose CEO supports traditional marriage, the mainstream media marshaled their troops to cover what was billed as a "kiss-in" counterdemonstration by gay rights activists at the same outlets last Friday. One problem: The media outnumbered the kissers. As an example, at a West Hollywood Chick-fil-A, the media presence was so ubiquitous that their denizens outnumbered the sparse participants, and the cops had to be called in because the media were interfering with customers' access to the establishment. Oh, they were out there. The Los Angeles Times dispatched no less than three reporters to cover the kiss-in, while barely giving the time of day ? mostly just short blog posts ? to the vast "Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day" that triggered it. USA Today described the participation in that event as "in the hundreds" ? a ridiculous underestimate given the company's estimated $8 million in extra sales ? and wire services were slow to file photos, leaving most of the work to the bloggers and social media. What does that say about the authenticity of this "kiss-in" event and the media's agenda? The first idea was to discredit the vast de facto demonstration on Aug. 1 by equating it with the gay counterdemonstration, falsely giving the impression the country is "split." by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

Behind Reid's Big Lie About Romney Is A Big Motive 8.6.12

Episode Description
Election '12: Democratic leaders and the Obama campaign are together keeping the media's focus on a defensive Mitt Romney instead of a failed presidency. How? By lying. Then by lying some more. In the history of the World's Greatest Deliberative Body, nine U.S. senators have been formally censured by their colleagues, after engaging in "conduct that tends to bring the Senate into dishonor and disrepute." Clearly, Harry Reid's fellow senators should, as soon as possible, make him the 10th member of that body to be so disciplined. What could bring more dishonor and disrepute to the institution than its leader, of all people, misusing the Senate floor to spread phony accusations, backed up by not a sliver of evidence? Reid is tag-teaming with the White House and the Obama campaign to get voters thinking about soon-to-be Republican nominee Mitt Romney's imaginary tax offenses ? instead of the very real 8.3% unemployment, a national debt that will soon exceed $16 trillion and the president's stated plans for more economic destruction via additional massive spending and tax increases if re-elected. Last week, Reid switched from first claiming that "a number of sources" told him Romney hadn't paid his taxes to the rumor purportedly coming from "an extremely credible source." The number in "a number of sources" was apparently the number one. As heavyweight blogging champion of the world Ed Morrissey points out, the only people who could have revealed anything about Romney's 10 years of personal tax returns are "the Romneys, their accountant and the IRS." No wonder the normally staid Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., took to CNN on Sunday to do what is almost unheard of within the senatorial old boys' club. He called a fellow senator a liar. "I think he's lying about his statement of knowing something about Romney," Graham said. by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

Obama Attempts To Suppress Ohio Military Vote 8.6.12

Episode Description
Politics: The administration likes to use soldiers for photo-ops but now, in a critical battleground state, they want to restrict the extra time for service members who protect our right to vote to cast theirs. mvsaclThe administration showed its true appreciation for military service when, on July 17, the Obama for America Campaign, the Democratic National Committee and the Ohio Democratic Party filed suit in that swing state to strike down part of the state's law governing voting by members of the military that gives them extra time to cast their ballots. Ohio is one of 32 states that allows early voting in person or by mail without an excuse. Until recently Ohio state law allowed early voting in person for everyone up until the Monday before the Tuesday election. The GOP-controlled legislature moved that deadline back to the Friday before, retaining the Monday deadline for military personnel. Republican Gov. John Kasich signed the bill into law. AMVETS, the National Guard Association of the United States, the U.S. Army Association and other organizations on Wednesday asked a judge to dismiss the suit that seeks to deny members of the military the three extra days to cast their votes early on the grounds that the Ohio legislature was not discriminating against anyone, but merely recognizing the difficulties service members can face in casting their ballots. While Democratic groups say the military exemption is "arbitrary" with "no discernible rational basis," military groups say federal and state law in fact recognizes the need to give military personnel extra time to vote. Considering that Ohio voters can cast early ballots up to 35 days before an election, the military extension imposes no undue hardship on other voters. by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

Emails Show Solyndra Push Was Rahm Emanuel's Idea 8.3.12

Episode Description
Scandal: The sunlight continues to expose the machinations behind the White House's support of failed solar panel manufacturer Solyndra with our tax dollars, including the false claim by former White House chief of staff. In a batch of White House emails released in a report on Solyndra by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Thursday, there's this gem: White House aide Aditya Kumar wrote to Jacob Levine of the Office of Energy and Climate Change on Aug. 19, 2009: "Feels like Rahm wants this too (barring any concerns) ? POTUS (President Of The United States) Involvement (in pushing Solyndra) was Rahm's idea." Of course, Emanuel, who helped bring the infamous "Chicago Way" of politics from the Windy City to the nation's capitol, has long denied being a mover and shaker in the Solyndra affair. Despite being Obama's chief of staff during the administration's green energy initiative in 2009, when the Solyndra loan was finalized, Emanuel told Chicago radio station WLS 890AM at a news conference in September 2011 about a new wellness initiative that he didn't remember anything about the failed investment loan by the Department of Energy that in fact was being fast-tracked by the White House. Vice President Joe Biden was scheduled to announce the closure of the Solyndra deal on Sept. 4, 2009, and several emails show pressure from the White House to approve the loan. President Obama also visited Solyndra to tout solar energy as a job-creating energy source of the future of which Solyndra was a key part. In an editorial last October, we noted an email reference to Emanuel that hinted at his involvement in the push to highlight Solyndra in advance of a presidential visit designed to promote Obama's program to use stimulus dollars to promote green energy. The Aug. 17, 2009, email released in one of the administration's famous Friday document dumps showed a White House staffer referring to Ron Klein, former chief of staff for Vice President Biden, saying to an Obama scheduler: "Ron said this morning that POTUS definitely wants to do this (or Rahm definitely wants to do this?)." In an editorial last September, we noted an Aug. 31, 2009, email in which an assistant to Emanuel wrote to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) about the upcoming Biden announcement on Solyndra and asked whether "there is anything we can help speed along on the OMB side." The director of the OMB at the time was Jack Lew, now White House chief of staff. by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

Ahmadinejad's Threat Vs. Israel Shouldn't Be Ignored 8.3.12

Episode Description
Middle East: If the Israeli prime minister said Iran needed to be destroyed, there justifiably would be global outrage. So where is the wrath when Iran's president asks, yet again, for the destruction of Israel? In a Ramadan speech covered by the Jerusalem Post, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said that "anyone who loves freedom and justice must strive for the annihilation of the Zionist regime in order to pave the way for world justice and freedom." It's not the first time he's called for Israel to be obliterated. And it's not the first time the world has yawned at such a statement from the Iranian leader. Maybe everyone thinks he's simply a clown and his words are meaningless. Why worry about what some powerless fanatic thinks, right? Or maybe the world thinks that something was lost in translation. Some believe that Ahmadinejad did not actually threaten to wipe Israel off the map in 2005. He was merely saying that the "regime" in Jerusalem must come to an end. But it just so happens that the seemingly cloddish and impotent ? and of course widely misunderstood ? Ahmadinejad is in line to get the world's next nuclear weapon. That puts Iran's top Holocaust denier in an entirely different light. Israel obviously has reason to be more alarmed than any other nation. Yet it should not be the only country fearful of the prospect of a nuclear-armed Tehran. While an atomic Iran is a profound threat to Israel's existence, it is also a danger to the entire Middle East region ? and beyond. With nuclear weapons, Tehran can bully all its Mideast neighbors. by OutloudOpinion.com For more Podcasts visit www.outloudopinion.com

Investor's Business Daily | Tue Aug, 7 | Share

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Obama's US Assassination Program? Part 1 7.26.10

Episode Description
Sound too conspiratorial to be true? Like the cover-up ops of spy novels? Well, it's reality. And it is possibly the most bizarre, inhumane and abusive way that the White House is expanding its power over the American people. It's not an extremist belief or theory of the far right. It's a fact that has been confirmed by The New York Times, The Washington Post and MSNBC and even documented by the far-left online magazine Salon.com. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Chuck Norris | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

Tasing Arizona 7.26.10

Episode Description
The Obama administration had gone to federal court to kill Arizona's new illegal-immigration law, scheduled to go into effect on Thursday. The Department of Justice argues that enforcement of the Arizona law "is pre-empted by federal law and therefore violates the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution." Does this mean that if Team Obama prevails over Arizona, San Francisco and other sanctuary cities should prepare to go to court against the feds? From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Debra J. Saunders | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

How Smart Are We? 7.26.10

Episode Description
Many of the wonderful-sounding ideas that have been tried as government policies have failed disastrously. Because so few people bother to study history, often the same ideas and policies have been tried again, either in another country or in the same country at a later time-- and with the same disastrous results. One of the ideas that has proved to be almost impervious to evidence is the idea that wise and far-sighted people need to take control and plan economic and social policies so that there will be a rational and just order, rather than chaos resulting from things being allowed to take their own course. It sounds so logical and plausible that demanding hard evidence would seem almost like nit-picking. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Thomas Sowell | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

On Bullying: It Takes One To Know One 7.26.10

Episode Description
President Obama was apparently moved enough by a letter from a Philadelphia fifth-grader about bullying that he wrote back and encouraged his correspondent to continue her quest to end bullying. Oh, how rich the irony! Barack Obama is nothing if not a bully. There, I said it, and I believe it's true, no matter how politically incorrect and inconsistent with the mainstream media's narrative it is. Before getting to some examples, let me direct your attention to the White House's comments on the exchange and the reaction of Obama's fifth-grade correspondent, Zina Stokes. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

David Limbaugh | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

Russia Spies; America Apologizes 7.26.10

Episode Description
Arriving at a biker's convention in Ukraine on his Harley Davidson trike, Vladimir Putin offered a few observations on his recent celebratory meeting with the 10 Russian sleeper agents deported from the United States. "They had a very difficult fate," the former KGB colonel noted sympathetically. "They had to carry out a task to benefit their motherland's interests for many, many years without a diplomatic cover, risking themselves and those close to them." The reunion was heartwarming. They sang patriotic songs and "talked of life." Putin assured them, reports the Associated Press, that they would have good jobs and a "bright" future. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Mona Charen | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

The Left Hates Conservatives 7.26.10

Episode Description
Perhaps the most telling of the recent revelations of the liberal/left Journolist, a list consisting of about 400 major liberal/left journalists, is the depth of their hatred of conservatives. That they would consult with one another in order to protect candidate and then President Obama and in order to hurt Republicans is unfortunate and ugly. But what is jolting is the hatred of conservatives, as exemplified by the e-mail from an NPR reporter expressing her wish to personally see Rush Limbaugh die a painful death -- and the apparent absence of any objection from the other liberal journalists. Every one of us on the right has seen this hatred. I am not referring to leftist bloggers or to anonymous extreme comments by angry leftists on conservative blogs -- such things exist on the right as well -- but to mainstream elite liberal journalists. There is simply nothing analogous among elite conservative journalists. Yes, nearly all conservatives believe that the left is leading America to ruin. But while there is plenty of conservative anger over this fact, there is little or nothing on the right to match the left's hatred of conservative individuals. Would mainstream conservative journalists e-mail one another wishes to be present while Harry Reid, Nancy Pelosi or Michael Moore dies slowly and painfully of a heart attack? From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Dennis Prager | Mon Jul, 26 | Share

Some Welcome Signs of Life From Private Sector 7.23.10

Episode Description
Grass somehow manages to grow up through small cracks in the sidewalk. Similarly, the American private sector somehow seems to be exerting itself despite the vast expansion of government by the Barack Obama administration and congressional Democrats. Case in point: the announcement last week by four oil companies -- Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil and Shell -- that they are setting up a $1 billion joint venture to design, build and operate a rapid-response system to contain offshore oil spills as deep as and deeper than BP's Deepwater Horizon disaster. Their goal is a system that can start mobilizing within 24 hours of an oil spill. They hope to have it up and running within 18 months. I suppose one might ask why oil companies didn't do this before. But it seems a vivid contrast with the apparently hapless performance of the Mineral Management Service, recently renamed the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, which seems to have sat on out-of-date response plans for years and which was not able to call in equipment and personnel to respond to the April 20 BP spill for weeks or months. Journalists tend to assume that effective regulation of potentially hazardous products can come only from government. But industry-generated organizations can provide it, as well. Consider Underwriters Laboratories, founded in 1894, whose UL stickers come attached to regulator products. Or the Society of Automotive Engineers, founded in 1905, which sets standards for the automobile and other industries. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Michael Barone | Fri Jul, 23 | Share

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A Message from OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Episode Description
A Message from OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Larry Elder | Fri Aug, 10 | Share

Economy: Obama Brags About Treading Water 6:14.12

Episode Description
After President Barack Obama said, "The private sector is doing fine," he later quickly regrouped. "The economy is not doing fine (emphasis added). That's the reason I had the press conference." But Obama said he was particularly concerned about losses in the public sector. The cluelessness is absolutely stunning. Obama is wrong about both the private and public sector. Obama's assessment of the economy reminds many of 2008 Republican presidential candidate John McCain's characterization of the economy. In September 2008, the investment firm Lehman Brothers was collapsing. Wall Street was shaking as the yet-to-be-declared recession deepened, but McCain said: "I think, still, the fundamentals of our economy are strong. But these are very, very difficult times." The reaction to McCain was harsh. His opponent, then-Sen. Obama, pounced: "We just woke up to news of financial disaster, and this morning he said that the fundamentals of the economy are still strong? Sen. McCain, what economy are you talking about?" The Washington Post said: "Sen. Barack Obama seized on McCain's assessment of the health of the economy, blasting the Republican for being 'disturbingly out of touch' with the reality that everyday Americans face. 'I just think he doesn't know,' Obama said in Grand Junction, Colo. 'He doesn't get what's happening between the mountain in Sedona where he lives and the corridors of Washington where he works.'"

Larry Elder | Thu Jun, 14 | Share

Obama Listens to Rich Liberals, at His Own Peril 6:14.12

Episode Description
Who does Barack Obama listen to? Not Republican politicians. Evidently weeks go by between his conversations with Speaker John Boehner, who determines what legislation comes to the House floor. Not Democratic politicians. We have it on good authority that he seldom talks to Democratic members of Congress. Lyndon Johnson used to be on the phone constantly, cajoling and inveigling but also on the alert for shifts in opinion. Speaker Tip O'Neill walked around the Capitol, asking member after member, "What do you hear?" In contrast, Obama, a former adviser told Vanity Fair's Todd Purdum, "is a total introvert. He doesn't need people." But there is one group of people Obama has to listen to: the people who give him large sums of money. He recently attended his 150th fundraiser. That's more than the number attended by the last four presidents put together. Obama has seen enough Architectural Digest-type interiors in Park Avenue triplexes and Beverly Hills mansions, and on the block in San Francisco's Pacific Heights, where every house is owned by a billionaire, to develop an expertise in Louis XV walnut commodes and Brunschwig & Fils fabrics. He's also had plenty of chances to absorb the advice of the kind of rich liberals who like to give money to Democratic presidents. And the evidence that he has taken some of that advice is his initiatives on three controversial issues, each of which involves serious political risk. The first and least risky of these stands is his endorsement of same-sex marriage. Many Democratic money-givers, straight as well as gay, have strong convictions on this issue and were probably not appeased by his assurance that he was "evolving" from his opposition to it.

Michael Barone | Thu Jun, 14 | Share

Create Wealth, Not Jobs 6:14.12

Episode Description
Soon after the president dropped his ill-advised "the private sector is doing fine" gaffe, White House press secretary Jay Carney scolded the media for failing to frame the comment in the proper "context." Which is weird, because the context is the worst part. Yes, government "creates" jobs, often out of thin air. The private sector creates wealth -- which, in turn, allows us to fund the vital work of sending weapons to Mexican drug lords and prosecuting Roger Clemens. Yet there is a pervasive argument coming from Democrats these days -- and, no doubt, the president was thinking of this context when he gaffed -- that goes something like this: "You know, if local governments hadn't laid off all those public service workers -- a policy conservatives embrace, mind you -- the unemployment rate would be closer to 7 percent rather than 8 percent." Let's just say that few Americans are grousing about the decline in government productivity since those dreadful purges. Having a robust array of government services is a luxury, not an engine of growth. Though taking out a massive advance against future prosperity to artificially pump up employment statistics might be an effective way to win re-election, it is no way to judge economic well-being. A decline of wealth, on the other hand, is. A new survey from the Federal Reserve found that both American income and wealth have deteriorated dramatically since 2007, as the median real income has fallen by 7.7 percent -- everyone taking a hit but "retirees and other nonworking families." For the average American, net worth has declined by about 40 percent since 2007 -- from $126,000 to $77,000. The average family can say goodbye to about 18 years' worth of savings. Meanwhile, not only does the Bureau of Labor Statistics find unemployment rates of government workers at 4.2 percent but also studies find that public-sector employees -- free of the constraints of demand -- make more than their private-sector counterparts in similar vocations. What this signals to the president, naturally, is that the economy is jonesing for more unsustainable busywork and debt. Hey, good salaries and job security -- what's not to like?

David Harsanyi | Thu Jun, 14 | Share

Under Obama, Things Keep Getting Worse 5.30.12

Episode Description
No matter what propaganda we see from the elite media or from Obama supporters, the American people will not be fooled. The May report by The Conference Board showed consumer confidence at its lowest point in the last five months. That might shock those who swallow the Obama administration's argument that it has produced significant job growth and reduced unemployment. That's all wonderful until you run into someone who has been unemployed for years and is not even counted in the unemployment figures. The fact is that the American people can feel it when things are not improving, and despite being told that the nation is making the turn toward a strengthening economy, the public feels the squeeze at every turn. Yes, we keep being told things are getting better, like the advance estimate of the first quarter's gross domestic product, which was originally reported at 2.2 percent. Oops, that number was revised at the end of May to be a tepid 1.9 percent. That is hardly news for celebration and additional reason not to trust any rosy projections that might arrive right before the November elections. Oh, and by the way, sales for existing houses dropped in April, shocking the experts who did not see it coming. Of course we are all told, based on our antiquated way of measuring inflation, that the cost of goods and services in America is really not rising much at all. Perhaps that is the case, but it seems hard to leave a grocery store these days with any reasonable amount of products and not drop at least a hundred dollars. And all of this for food and other products that seem to be in smaller and smaller packages. I guess that's not inflation, it's just imagination. As for the thrill we should all have over the decline in gas prices, well, many just are not so overjoyed. We are nowhere near the average price for gas on the day President Obama was inaugurated. That price, even "deemed" as correct under this new print media "judge and jury" known as "Politifact," was $1.79. While oil prices rise and fall (and, curiously, often fall when the public starts to really complain), the price in most areas of the nation is well into the three dollar plus range. Now, of course, that's not inflation, it's just imagination.

Matt Towery | Thu May, 31 | Share

Why Jeremiah Wright Matters -- Still, Part II 5.30.12

Episode Description
Once upon a time, analysts, pundits and historians explored the relationship between a given subject and his father. We do so for possible insight into the subject's values, character, decision-making process, biases, interests, fears, etc. You know -- acorn, tree. But the standard intellectual inquiry, for some reason, does not apply to the long, intimate relationship between Barack Obama and the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who called himself a "second father" to young Barack. Sen. Obama described his 20-year relationship with his pastor this way: "What I value most about Pastor Wright is not his day-to-day political advice. He's much more of a sounding board for me to make sure that I am speaking as truthfully about what I believe as possible and that I'm not losing myself in some of the hype and hoopla and stress that's involved in national politics." Indeed, Obama describes a relationship that is (SET ITAL) closer, far closer (END ITAL) than the relationship that many sons have with their fathers. Leftist New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd confidently places the actions, policies and decisions of George W. Bush at the feet of his father. Dowd insists, for example, that George W. Bush's decision to invade Iraq was Dad-driven. She called the Iraq War "a Freudian tango" that provided a "chance for W. to complete his transformation from the screwup son to the son who fixed his father's screwups." None of that fear of chemical or biological attack in the wake of 9/11 national security stuff for Dowd. No, it's all about Dad. In a recent column comparing blue-blooded "patricians" Bush-41 and Mitt Romney, Dowd writes, "Their political philosophies were not shaped by a passion for ideas as much as a desire to serve and an ambition to climb higher than their revered fathers. Pragmatism trumps ideology; survival trumps conviction. Both men, to the manner born in Greenwich and Bloomfield Hills, adapted uncomfortably to the fundamentalist tent meeting mood of the modern GOP, knowing their futures depended on Faustian deals with the right." But Obama and Wright's relationship tells us nothing.

Larry Elder | Thu May, 31 | Share

Obama Campaign May Be Fooling Itself 5.30.12

Episode Description
"Axelrod is endeavoring not to panic." So reads a sentence in John Heilemann's exhaustive article on Barack Obama's campaign in this week's New York magazine. Heilemann is a fine reporter and was co-author with Time's Mark Halperin of a best-selling book on the 2008 presidential campaign. While his sympathies are undoubtedly with Obama, he does a fine job of summarizing the arguments and tactics of both sides. And he's capable of directing snark at both candidates. Samples: Romney "seems to suffer a hybrid of affluenza and Tourette's." "A cynic might say that the liberation Obama feels is the freedom from, you know, actually governing." Heilemann's article is well-sourced. It's based on interviews with David Axelrod, the former White House aide now back in Chicago, David Plouffe, the 2008 manager now in the White House, and Jim Messina, the current campaign manager. The picture Heilemann draws is of campaign managers whose assumptions have been proved wrong and who seem to be fooling themselves about what will work in the campaign. One assumption that has been proved wrong is that the Obama campaign would raise $1 billion and that, as in 2008, far more money would be spent for Democrats than Republicans. Heilemann reports the campaign managers' alibis. Obama has given donors "shabby treatment," he writes. This of a president who has attended more fundraisers than his four predecessors combined. As for the Obama-authorized super PAC being $90 million short of its $100 million goal, well, it was late getting started and some money-givers don't like negative ads.

Michael Barone | Thu May, 31 | Share

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Jihadist 5th Column 12.21.09

Episode Description
How the Pentagon?s political correctness compromises our security. Exclusive interview with the Hoover Institute?s Paul Sperry. Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Mon Dec, 21 | Share

The Best-Laid Plans 12.17.09

Episode Description
How government planning harms your quality of life. Interview with the Cato Institute?s Randal O?Toole. Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Thu Dec, 17 | Share

Government Fortune Teller 12.5.09

Episode Description
How the Congressional Budget Office really works, and why it?s forced to use incomplete data and suspect assumptions. Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Fri Dec, 4 | Share

Zelaya Returns? 11.6.09

Episode Description
Hondura president-in-exile Mel Zelaya may return - if the government that ousted him in June allows it. Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Fri Nov, 6 | Share

Thomas Sowell Interview 10.30.09

Episode Description
Economics vs. Politics in the Health Care Debate Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Fri Oct, 30 | Share

Socialized Internet? 10.15.09

Episode Description
The Radical Philosophy Behind Net Neutrality Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Thu Oct, 15 | Share

The REAL Cost of Government 9.18.09

Episode Description
How 61% of our income goes to taxes and regulations at the Federal, State and Local level. Powered by OutloudOpinion

Investor's Business Daily | Fri Sep, 18 | Share

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The Humiliation of Britain 10.27.10

Episode Description
At the end of 2008, as the financial crisis hit with full force, the countries of the world divided into two groups: those whose leaders decided to muddle through, and China. Only the Chinese took seriously Milton Friedman?s and John Maynard Keynes?s argument that, when faced with the possibility of a depression, the first thing to do is use the government to intervene strategically in product and financial markets to maintain the flow of aggregate demand. Then, at the start of 2010, the countries that had been muddling through divided into two groups: those where government credit was unimpaired continued to muddle through, while countries like Greece and Ireland, where government credit was impaired, had no choice but to pursue austerity and try to restore fiscal confidence. Today, another split is occurring, this time between those countries that are continuing to muddle through and Great Britain. Even though the British government?s credit is still solid gold, Prime Minister David Cameron?s administration is about to embark on what may be the largest sustained fiscal contraction ever: a plan to shrink the government budget deficit by 9% of GDP over the next four years. So far, China is doing the best in dealing with the financial crisis. The mudding-through countries lag behind. And those where confidence in the government?s liabilities has cracked, forcing the government into austerity, are doing worst. Now the question is: will Britain ? where confidence in the government has not cracked and where austerity is not forced but chosen ? join the others at the bottom and serve as a horrible warning? Read by OutloudOpinion

Bradford DeLong | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

The French Reactionary Revolution 10.26.10

Episode Description
The expression ?the French exception? applies not only to culinary matters, but to social and economic issues as well. A majority of today?s French recognize that raising the retirement age is necessary to ensure the survival of the pension system. Yet, according to all public-opinion polls, close to 70% of the French support the demonstrators who are taking to the streets to block the very modest reforms introduced by President Nicolas Sarkozy?s government. ?The French exception? is the product of an encounter between a peculiar political and intellectual history and the rejection of the elites currently in power. To the dismay of their European neighbors, and in front of a bemused global public, the French are once again demonstrating their bizarre tradition of using revolutionary means to express extreme conservative leanings. Unlike their predecessors in May 1968, today?s demonstrators are not in the streets to defend a different and better future. They are out there in significant numbers to protect the status quo, and to express their nostalgia for the past and their fear of the future. And yet the reactionary/revolutionary movement of the type that we are witnessing ? a backlash against the inevitable consequences of globalization ? remains unmistakably French. It is driven by the extreme Cartesian rationality, verging on the absurd, of a country whose citizens continue to view their state in the same way that adolescents view their parents. Read by OutloudOpinion

Dominique Moisi | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

The Scaremongers of the Roundtable 10.20.10

Episode Description
How often do you see capitalists screaming and even going to court to defend the principle that legitimate owners cannot exercise any control over their property? It is not happening in Latin America or in socialist Sweden, but in the United States of America. The capitalists in question are nothing short of the upper echelon of corporate America: the Business Roundtable, a powerful group composed of the CEOs of major US corporations, which promotes pro-business public policies. The object of their contention is the much-debated ?shareholders? access to proxy? rule, adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in August to address the fundamental lack of accountability of corporate boards. In the current system, corporate boards are self-perpetuating entities. To be elected, a board member needs to be nominated by the current board, where executives have considerable influence. As a result, board members owe their loyalty to the managers who directly or indirectly appoint them ? and thus have little incentive to dissent, lest they be punished with exclusion. Even independent directors, often acclaimed as the solution to all problems, are subject to the same pressure. To change this state of affairs, institutional investors must be allowed to propose their own slate of directors. The possibility of being rejected in a real election would naturally make board members accountable to shareholders, indirectly making the executives accountable as well. The SEC rule was an attempt to grant institutional investors this right. It did it in a very mild format. Companies with a public share worth less than $75 million were exempted, and shareholders who want to propose a slate must hold at least 3% of voting power of the company?s securities and have held it continuously for at least three years. Read by OutloudOpinion

Luigi Zingales | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

Health Care?s Frequent Flyers 10.20.10

Episode Description
For those of you who have seen the (American) movie ?Up in the Air,? think of the scene where George Clooney meets Vera Farmiga. He?s an outsourced human-resources executive who flies around the country firing people on behalf of timid managers; she?s a counterpart female road warrior. Their courtship ritual revolves around loyalty cards: he pulls out his American Airlines Executive Platinum card; she matches. Next, his Diamond VIP Hilton HHonors card; she calmly slaps hers on the rickety table where they are sharing drinks. The unspoken message: points make you sexy. Airlines and hotels have known this for a long time. Dean Margolis, who long ago consulted for major airlines and is now applying the same techniques to healthy behavior, recalls wondering how to get executives to fly just a little more. It?s not by offering discounts, which benefit an executive?s company rather than the executive. Margolis asks: ?When the boss says ?Who wants to come to Philadelphia with me??, what?s going to get two people instead of one to say yes? To abandon their families, stand in line, and perhaps take a middle seat...? Points, of course, will do the trick. The promise of being recognized at the airline counter, ushered to the front of the line, and, yes, looking like a big shot at the airport bar. Margolis?s new company, MedRewards, plans to give people points for healthy behavior ? everything from taking their medications regularly to signing in at the gym more than five times a week. As in the airline business, the actual customers won?t be the users, but rather the vendors who want to influence users? behavior: pharmaceutical companies who want patients to buy their drugs, along with insurers and employers who want to lower long-term costs. (Employers, bless them, even have an interest in keeping people healthy!) Read by OutloudOpinion

Esther Dyson | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

Obama at Halftime 10.12.10

Episode Description
In September 2008, the global economy and financial system was hit by an earthquake, whose epicenter was in the United States. It was the end of the Bush administration. The presidential election was two months away. The timing, from the point of view of crisis management, could not have been worse. The level of uncertainty about asset values, solvency, and the connectedness of balance sheets that prevailed at the time was extraordinarily high. Uncertainty bred fear, causing banks, businesses, and households to hoard cash. Consumption plummeted, taking down retail sales with it, and, after a short lag, employment and investment as well. Individually rational choices were giving rise to collectively irrational results. These conditions had all the makings of a depression scenario, with credit rationing destroying businesses indiscriminately, and thus required fast, aggressive, and unconventional action by the US government and the Federal Reserve. The response, mounted by the Bush administration and taken over by the Obama administration, was all of the above. A combination of financial-sector recapitalization and rapid expansion of the Fed?s balance sheet prevented a complete credit lockup. Policies sometimes missed their target and had to be modified. For example, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) originally targeted the purchase of complex securitized assets that had lost value and stopped trading, but had to be partly altered to direct infusions of capital into banks. Financial support for Wall Street villains infuriated many, but no one proposed a better alternative at the time ? or has since. The Bush and Obama administrations both understood that wise policymaking in crisis circumstances requires selecting the least bad option, accepting the inevitable anger and criticism, and implementing the decision quickly. The first priority, after all, was to stabilize a highly dangerous situation. Read by OutloudOpinion

Michael Spence | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

The Wars of Austerity 10.12.10

Episode Description
I have become increasingly less hopeful about prospects for a rapid recovery from the global recession. Coordinated fiscal expansion ($5 trillion) by the world?s leading governments arrested the downward slide, but failed to produce a healthy rebound. The current frustration is summed up by The Economist?s recent cover headline: ?Grow, dammit, grow.? There are two reasons to be pessimistic. The first reason is the premature withdrawal of the ?stimulus? measures agreed upon by the G-20 in London in April 2009. All the main countries are now committed to slashing their budget deficits. The second reason is that nothing has been done to address the problem of current-account imbalances. Indeed, the talk nowadays of currency wars leading to trade wars is reminiscent of the disastrous experience of the 1930?s. The problem of current-account imbalances is closely linked to the existence of a world savings glut. One part of the world, led by China, earns more than it spends, whereas another part, notably the United States, spends more than it earns. Provided the surplus countries invest in the deficit countries, these imbalances pose no macroeconomic problem. Indeed, this was the nineteenth-century pattern. A system of foreign investment, pivoting on London, channeled the savings of rich (or surplus) countries to the poor (or deficit) countries. Despite many financial crises and defaults, this creditor-debtor relationship worked, on the whole, to the benefit of both sides. Rich-country investors earned a higher rate of return than they would at home, and poor-country recipients raised the development finance they needed. There was no persistent tendency to deflation. Read by OutloudOpinion

Robert Skidelsky | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

Only the Weak Survive 10.12.10

Episode Description
The risk of global currency and trade wars is rising, with most economies now engaged in competitive devaluations. All are playing a game that some must lose. Today?s tensions are rooted in paralysis on global rebalancing. Over-spending countries ? such as the United States and other ?Anglo-Saxon? economies ? that were over-leveraged and running current-account deficits now must save more and spend less on domestic demand. To maintain growth, they need a nominal and real depreciation of their currency to reduce their trade deficits. But over-saving countries ? such as China, Japan, and Germany ? that were running current-account surpluses are resisting their currencies? nominal appreciation. A higher exchange rate would reduce their current-account surpluses, because they are unable or unwilling to reduce their savings and sustain growth through higher spending on domestic consumption. Within the eurozone, this problem is exacerbated by the fact that Germany, with its large surpluses, can live with a stronger euro, whereas the PIIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, and Spain) cannot. On the contrary, with their large external deficits, the PIIGS need a sharp depreciation to restore growth as they implement painful fiscal and other structural reforms. A world where over-spending countries need to reduce domestic demand and boost net exports, while over-saving countries are unwilling to reduce their reliance on export-led growth, is a world where currency tensions must inevitably come to a boil. Aside from the eurozone, the US, Japan, and the United Kingdom all need a weaker currency. Even Switzerland is intervening to weaken the franc. Read by OutloudOpinion

Nouriel Roubini | Thu Oct, 28 | Share

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Netanyahu Is Not the Problem 11.10.11

Episode Description
At the G20 Summit last week in Cannes, Nicolas Sarkozy held only four private meetings. One was with Barack Obama and a second was with Manmohan Singh, prime minister of India. (It?s not clear whether Felipe Calderon, the president of Mexico, met alone with the French president or whether his country was a fully deserved separate topic on the agenda, perhaps as a ?disaster in the process.?) The other two privileged to have Sarkozy alone face-to-face were Hu Jintao, president of the People?s Republic of China, and William Gates, co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, literally the only people in attendance representing enterprises that are financially solvent. Take a look at these primarily optimistic documents and try to assess the honesty of the reports. Actually, this is the measure of our politics: deception, self-deception, duplicity, hypocrisy, pretense. It was at this jamboree of whoppers that Sarkozy chose to confide to President Obama that he ?can?t stand Netanyahu anymore. He is a liar.? And the president responded, sort of in kind: ?You?re fed up with him. But I have to deal with him every day.? Of course, this was one of those moments that journalists dream about. The microphone was on when it was supposed to be off. Now, Sarkozy is not exactly known for his verisimilitude and neither is Obama, whose foreign policy, in particular, is based on the silliest improvisations of history. He has certainly made up his narratives on Muslim culture, in general, and on American-Arab relations, in particular. This accumulated flim-flam has made U.S. policy in the orbit of the crescent a laughing-stock for, well, everyone.

Martin Peretz | Fri Nov, 11 | Share

How Congress?s Showdown With China Puts Obama in a Serious Bind 10.06.11

Episode Description
While all of Washington fastened its gaze on Chris Christie, the most important issue of the week?maybe of the year?was playing out on the floor of the Senate. By a margin of 79 to 19, senators agreed to consider a measure that would allow the United States to impose tariffs on another country if the Treasury found its currency to be ?misaligned.? As the Wall Street Journal points out, this is a less demanding standard than current law, which ?requires a finding of intentional manipulation.? If this newfound bipartisan comity in Congress over the issue of confronting China culminates in a bill that passes both houses, it will put Obama in a serious bind: either adopt a similarly hawkish stance and risk a trade war, or issue a veto that would expose him to attack from the Republican nominee and provoke a populist backlash from workers and communities throughout America?s hard-pressed manufacturing sector. The huge bipartisan majority on the procedural question this week virtually guarantees that the bill will make it through the Senate, and it illuminates the changing contours of the China trade issue. Nearly every Democrat voted to proceed; Washington?s Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray and (intriguingly) Claire McCaskill of Missouri were the only dissidents. And fully 31 of the 47 Senate Republicans supported the motion as well, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Conference Chairman Lamar Alexander, Policy Committee Chairman John Thune, and John Cornyn, who heads the committee responsible for electing more Republicans to the Senate in 2012. Among the party?s leadership, John Kyl stood alone in opposition.

William Galston | Thu Oct, 6 | Share

How Ahmadinejad?s Regime Tried - and Failed - to Break One Protester's Spirit 9.22.11

Episode Description
As the world grants an audience to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad today at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, we would be better served to look upon Samiye Tohidlou. Samiye is a child of the Iranian revolution, born in 1979, when the current regime came to power. She comes from a family of educators; her father was a teacher who declared, after the arrest of his daughter, that he had been a staunch supporter of the revolution. Samiye was herself a doctoral student in sociology at Tehran University?the country?s oldest and most venerable institution?and an active member of the Islamic Student Association. And she was a volunteer for Mir Hussein Mousavi?s presidential campaign in 2009. When the regime announced Ahmadinejad the winner even before the polls closed, in Tehran alone three million people took to the streets to protest what they considered to be an electoral putsch. Samiye had a brilliant and elegantly simple idea. She suggested that protesters create an uninterrupted chain of humanity, from Tehran?s rich, northern neighborhoods to the south?s poorest ghettoes. The only connective thread of this long chain was a green ribbon, symbolizing the movement that had emerged in opposition to the electoral coup.

Abbas Milani | Thu Sep, 22 | Share

Texas Dispatch: How Ron Paul Sparked a Movement - Only to Lose his District 9.22.11

Episode Description
Ron Paul doesn?t like Rick Perry. And if Thursday?s debate is anything like the last two, you?ll hear about it tonight. At the first GOP debate to feature Perry, Paul pointed to the governor?s past as a Democrat and cited his support for Clinton-era efforts at healthcare reform. In an ad earlier this month, Paul?s campaign dredged up Perry?s 1988 support for Al Gore. ?America must decide who to trust,? a voice in the ad proclaims, ?Al Gore?s Texas cheerleader or the one who stood with Reagan.? And in an open letter to Perry, Paul?s campaign chair spelled out the line of criticism once more: ?We don?t think the fact that you used to be a Democrat is the big problem here. The real problem is that, too often, you still act like one.? For all Paul?s efforts, however, the criticism just hasn?t stuck. Indeed, if anything, Perry has garnered attention, both negative and positive, for the ways in which his criticisms of Medicare and Social Security?stated most clearly in his 2010 book Fed Up!?mirror those of his cranky rival from the right. And, in an ironic twist of fate, while Perry is reaping the benefits of such radical stances, Paul, their longtime proponent, is struggling to stay relevant. Despite his third place standing in most polls, Paul gets hardly any media attention. He has almost no friends in the GOP establishment. And when he ends his quixotic presidential bid, he plans to retire from Congress rather than run in his newly redrawn district, which state GOP legislators recently made much more difficult for him to hold onto. As Jason Stanford, a longtime Democratic campaign consultant in the state, puts it: ?The paradox of Ron Paul is that he?s never been more influential or less popular in Texas.? What happened?

Abby Rapoport | Thu Sep, 22 | Share

Hillary Clinton?s Embarrassing, Disingenuous Equivocating on the Crisis in Sudan 5.23.11

Episode Description
In a recent op-ed in The Washington Post about the independence of South Sudan, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton offered a conspicuous example of the Obama administration?s policy of equivocation when it comes to the world?s newest nation and the country it split from last weekend. Namely, the op-ed disingenuously equated the Khartoum regime with its adversaries in South Sudan, in the embattled regions of South Kordofan and Abyei, and in Darfur. The evident logic of such false equivalence is that it?s necessary to keep Khartoum engaged in negotiations: If ?both sides,? as Clinton refers to them repeatedly, are equally responsible for violence and for the failure to resolve outstanding issues like the North-Southborder delineation, then diplomacy will be able to exert pressure to compromise. Never mind that compromise?indeed, many compromises?have already been made by the South; the real problem here is that President Omar Al Bashir?s regime has refused to live up to the agreements.

Eric Reeves | Thu Jul, 14 | Share

The Hawk 5.23.11

Episode Description
When America traded George W. Bush for Barack Obama, few thought the result would be an escalation in the American war on terror. Swathes of U.S. conservatives (but also some liberals) were ready to dismiss President Obama as too na´ve and idealistic to be president in the face of a heightened terrorist threat. Moderates did not believe that a campaign based on hope and change would cause Al Qaeda terrorists to fear this president more than the previous one. In Europe, meanwhile, Obama was seen as someone who would roll back the vulgarities of the war and make Europe feel good again about its more police-driven approach to terrorism. Today, however, the handful of dissenters from this line of thinking looks prescient. Following the death of Osama bin Laden, it is clear Obama won?t be outflanked by the right on counterterrorism. Sending a team of operatives into Pakistan without that country?s knowledge because we believed (correctly) that bin Laden was there is not the work of a softie. Yet that decision is only one achievement in Obama?s well-established, hawkish approach to the war on terror?an approach that, whatever one thinks of its ethical merits, will serve him well in his reelection campaign.

Robin Simcox | Tue May, 24 | Share

After Osama bin Laden 5.2.11

Episode Description
Al Qaeda has been on the run and in deterioration, unable to launch a spectacular attack like that of September 11 for quite some time now. With the death of Osama bin Laden, this demise will continue?and perhaps be expedited. Still, the threat of jihadist terrorism remains, namely in the short-term, and the American counter-terrorism community would be well-advised to maintain its vigilance in the coming months. The immediate reaction of Al Qaeda and its sympathizers to bin Laden?s death is sure to be one of shock and dismay, but it?s only a matter of time before those emotions give way to anger. And the irate have a tendency to lash out. Al Qaeda was depreciating before bin Laden?s death. For nearly a decade, U.S. military operations have had its senior leadership in disarray. As drone strikes escalated under the Obama administration, the core of the Al Qaeda seemed to be more concerned about surviving the night than seizing the day. This, in part, explains why the organization was never able to re-group after September 11 to launch another major attack against the U.S. Even when Osama bin Laden and his deputy, Ayman Al Zawahiri, were able to release messages, they increasingly fell flat.

Louis Klarevas | Mon May, 2 | Share

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A Message from OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Episode Description
A Message from OutloudOpinion 8.10.12

Joel Beckett | Fri Aug, 10 | Share

Conservatives Against Consumption 03.29.12

Episode Description
Republican presidential hopefuls, who are strenuously trying to outdo each other in defending family values, may be overlooking a chief cause of modern moral and social decay: increased fossil fuel use. That was the surprising suggestion recently made by a couple of conservative intellectuals, Georgetown University political philosopher Patrick Deneen and American Conservative blogger Rod Dreher. The two were provoked by conservative columnist George Will. ?A specter is haunting progressivism, the specter of abundance,? Will declared in his final syndicated column of 2011. Progressives, he asserted, ?crave energy scarcities as an excuse for rationing?by them?that produces ever-more-minute government supervision of Americans? behavior.? From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Ronald Bailey | Fri Mar, 30 | Share

Job Killers 03.29.12

Episode Description
Politicians say they ?create jobs.? In fact, only the private sector generates the information needed to create real, productive jobs. Since this current post-recession job recovery is the slowest in 80 years, you?d think that even know-it-all politicians would want to sweep away the labyrinth of government regulations that hinders job creation. Successful job creators like Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and Staples founder Tom Stemberg tell me there are so many new rules and taxes today that it would be difficult, if not impossible, for them to create the thousands of jobs they once made. The feds now have 160,000 pages of rules. Does anyone read all that? I doubt it. (Members of Congress don?t read the bills they vote on.) Do the rules make life safer? No. A few new rules are useful, but most are not. Their sheer volume makes us less safe and less free. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

John Stossel | Fri Mar, 30 | Share

Why the Health Insurance Mandate Is Immoral and Unnecessary 03.29.12

Episode Description
The Obama administration argued to the U.S. Supreme Court this week that people must be compelled to buy medical insurance (designed by the government) or the national medical-insurance market will fail. Thus, Obamacare advocates say, the insurance mandate is consistent with the powers delegated under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The argument, however, contains a fatal flaw. If the medical-insurance market would indeed fail without a mandate, it?s only because of other mandates the government has already imposed. Thus the government has created the rationale for an extension of its own power. The administration foresees two problems in the absence of the mandate. First, uninsured people will avoid routine and preventive medical care and go to hospital emergency rooms when they can?t delay care any longer, raising costs to others. Second, some people will apply for insurance only after they are seriously ill. As a result, the insurance market will be dominated by sick people, making it unviable. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Sheldon Richman | Fri Mar, 30 | Share

Better Off Dead 03.28.12

Episode Description
A stainless steel casket with cherry veneer inserts can set you back more than a foreclosed townhouse in the exurbs of Las Vegas. Then there?s the embalming, the funeral service, the cemetery plot, the headstone, the charge for digging a grave, the charge for filling that grave back up, the eternal lawn-mowing and weeding fees. These days, millions of us can?t afford to die, much less spend our afterlives slumbering in a suitable memorial property of our own. Instead, in this age of widening income disparity, all that most of us can hope for is two and a half hours in an 1,800 degree oven, then a time-shared hereafter on the living-room mantels of our surviving relatives, homeless for eternity in a discount keepsake urn. This, at least, was the spin The New York Times gave to the rising popularity of cremation in a December 2011 article titled ?In Tough Times, a Boom in Cremations as a Way to Save Money.? According to the Cremation Association of North America, an industry trade group, 41 percent of the approximately 2.4 million people who die each year in the U.S. choose cremation over a traditional burial. The Times suggested the poor economy was partly responsible for this trend. To support this conclusion, the article quoted a handful of funeral directors and cited a ?national telephone survey of 858 adults? that the Funeral and Memorial Information Council, an industry group, commissioned in 2010, finding that ?one-third of those who chose cremation in 2010 said cost was a primary factor, up from 19 percent in 1990.? From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Greg Beato | Fri Mar, 30 | Share

Is the CIA in Your Kitchen? 03.28.12

Episode Description
If this question had been asked by a fictional character in a spy thriller, it might intrigue you, but you wouldn't imagine that it could be true in reality. If the Constitution means what it says, you wouldn't even consider the plausibility of an affirmative answer. After all, the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution was written to prevent the government from violating on a whim or a hunch or a vendetta that uniquely American right: the right to be left alone. Everyone wants, at some point in the day, at some places in the home, to be left alone. The colonists who fought the war of secession from Great Britain were no different. But that war and the wish to keep the government at bay had been heightened by the colonial experiences involved in the enforcement of the Stamp Act. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Andrew Napolitano | Fri Mar, 30 | Share

The Ryan-Romney Budget 03.26.12

Episode Description
The burst of attention devoted to Congressman Paul Ryan?s 2013 federal budget seems to have passed, at least momentarily, but don?t be deceived: the plan rolled out last week by the Republican chairman of the House Budget Committee is going to be important for a long time to come. If Mitt Romney wins the presidential election, the budget, which he endorsed, is a good guide to what he will try to accomplish. If Mr. Romney loses, the budget is a good guide to what Mr. Ryan might try to run on as a Republican presidential contender in 2016. And it?s certain that President Obama and his allies will try to use the plan to attack the Republican candidates in the upcoming election. From OutloudOpinion - For Podcasts of IBDeditorials, The New Republic, and Over 30 Syndicated Columnists, go to www.outloudopinion.com

Ira Stoll | Mon Mar, 26 | Share

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8.13.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
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Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.12.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.11.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.10.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.07.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.06.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

8.05.09 Jim Pfaff on the news of the day. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Episode Description
You can listen from Colorado Springs to Denver, CO on 560 KLZ AM. Live Streaming at www.560TheSource.com. And our podcast is at www.OutloudOpinion.com.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion

Jim Pfaff and OutloudOpinion | Wed Aug, 19 | Share

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French to buy the White Cliffs of Dover from UK Labour government 2.17.09

Episode Description
Appalled at the historical inversion, Ann ?Babe? Huggett, looks at what the sale of the White Cliffs of Dover to France means for the UK and potentially what it might mean for America?s future.
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Anne "Babe" Huggett | Wed Feb, 17 | Share

John Boehner is Kidding Himself 2.11.09

Episode Description
House Minority leader John Boehner has fooled himself into believing that there are no substantive differences between the Tea Party movement and the GOP establishment in Washington. Boy is he wrong.
Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Warner Todd Huston | Thu Feb, 11 | Share

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss 2.11.09

Episode Description
Fashionista, Ann ?Babe? Huggett, lets her readers in on how fashion can be used to predict political election outcomes both here in the US and over in the UK.
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Ann "Babe" Huggett | Thu Feb, 11 | Share

Obama's Lobbyist Slams Mask Big K Street Payday 2.1.09

Episode Description
In his State of the Union speech, the president puffed up his chest, fixed his Mr. scornful face, and once again pulled out the populist's handbook to bash those evil, monstrous lobbyists. But his huffing and puffing hide the big paydays he's given lobbyists.
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Warner Todd Huston | Mon Feb, 1 | Share

Supermarket bans PJs and bare feet Synopsis 2.1.10

Episode Description
Distressed at seeing the US slob phenomenon of wearing PJs as outerwear spread to the UK, Ann ?Babe? Huggett explains to the sartorially clueless why they should leave their jammies at home where they belong.
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Anne "Babe" Huggett | Mon Feb, 1 | Share

In Worst Economy in Decades, Oregon Considers Massive Tax Hike 1.11.09

Episode Description
In the worst economy since the Great Depression, the State of Oregon considers destroying its business community and jobs climate even further with a massive tax hike that will kill jobs. But with ballot measures 66 and 67 the voters have a chance to stop them.
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Warner Todd Huston | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

This Chick Does Flicks: Sherlock Holmes Synopsis 1.11.09

Episode Description
Thrilled with Director Guy Ritchie?s latest endeavor, Ann ?Babe? Huggett spreads the good word about his ?must see? mystery adventure thriller, Sherlock Holmes.
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Ann "Babe" Huggett | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

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Warner Todd Huston - Publius' Forum


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The Roger Hedgecock Show


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G. Gordon Liddy


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The Steve Gill Show


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The Conservative Fun House


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The Draking Point


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Saint Elmo's Fire: Christendom and Liquor >>

Episode Description

“In the beginning, God created yeast and barley, and lo, for it was good…” That according to the Book of Billy Bob in the King Bubba Version. Ok…That’s definately not in the Bible. Welcome to The Draking Point!"

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Ash White | Sun Mar, 7 | Share

Ghost Malls >>

Episode Description

Welcome to The Draking Point >>, where my opinion costs 2 cents and all the outrage is manufactured in the USA!

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Drake Dunaway | Wed Feb, 10 | Share

The Last Temptation of the GOP >>

Episode Description

I am composing this appeal to your considerations, with all due respect for the fact that Conservatism manifests itself in many forms and stripes...

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Drake Dunaway | Sun Jan, 17 | Share

One of Us >>

Episode Description

So it seems rather strange that such a powerful God would lower himself with such humility (an emotion that He doesn’t rightfully need) and arrive as His word in the life of a man; Jesus of Nazareth...

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Drake Dunaway | Mon Dec, 14 | Share

Pre-Traumatic Terrorism >>

Episode Description

On November 5, 2009, Major Nidal Malik Hasan stormed into Fort Hood Military Base, gunning down and killing 13 of his fellow soldiers and injuring 30 more. Witnesses claim he shrieked: “Allah hu Akbar!” in his frenzy while carrying out his cowardly and dastardly attack on un-deployed soldiers in their off hours...

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Drake Dunaway | Tue Nov, 24 | Share

Our Enduring Heartstrings >>

Episode Description

I’m an artist, or rather a man with a dilettante appreciation for what we loosely refer to as “The Arts.” And I fear with each passing decade that our generation is losing a bit of itself...

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Drake Dunaway | Thu Nov, 5 | Share

A Semi-Charmed Kinda Life>>

Episode Description

So now the Nobel Prize is Obama's and Arafat’s, not Ghandi’s.

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Drake Dunaway | Wed Oct, 14 | Share

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The Edwards Notebook


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Cupid's Arrow 2.11.10

Episode Description
In this politically correct environment it is getting harder and harder for Cupid to shoot a straight arrow these days! Love used to have a simpler target for Cupids aim. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Ron Edwards | Tue Feb, 16 | Share

A Glimmer of Hope for the US Auto Industry 1.23.10

Episode Description
Ron Edwards visits the North American International Auto Show in Detroit and discovers a glimmer of hope. Discovering some shining examples of private business and ingenious enterprise from a California business owner. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Ron Edwards | Mon Jan, 25 | Share

We the People Need to Do It right or Not At All! 1.9.10

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We the People Need to Do It right or Not At All! 1.9.10 Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Ron Edwards | Fri Jan, 22 | Share

Edwards Notebook - 1.2.10

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Ron Edwards | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

Edwards Notebook - 12.19.09

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Ron Edwards | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

Edwards Notebook - 11.12.09

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Edwards Notebook - 11.12.09 Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Ron Edwards | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

Edwards Notebook - 11.12.09

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Edwards Notebook - 11.12.09 Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Ron Edwards | Mon Jan, 11 | Share

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Imprimis - Hillsdale College


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April - Reasserting Federalism in Defense of Liberty - Ken Cuccinelli

Episode Description
SOME FAVORITE VIRGINIANS OF MINE who inspired and crafted our federal Constitution?Mason, Madison, Jefferson, and Henry?also drafted the Constitution of Virginia. And in the latter, they included a critical statement that said, ?No free government, nor the blessings of liberty, can be preserved . . . but by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.? Our founders well understood that our liberty could not be preserved without frequently referring back to first principles. But while they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor to defend those principles, we have often taken them for granted, as we have become complacent in thinking that government will take care of every problem. We have asked government to do more for us, and all the government asks for in return is a little bit more of our liberty. Over the decades, we kept asking. And because the courts and the politicians were all too happy to oblige, regardless of what the Constitution said, we no longer have a federal government of limited powers. We have an overreaching central government?a government that seeks to plan and control virtually every aspect of our lives and our economy, from health care, to energy, to automobile manufacturing, to banking and insurance. Thankfully, though, in the last several years, people have woken up and are pushing back. With this pushback, we are seeing the idea of federalism reemerge. People want to return to a government of limited, enumerated powers, and an arrangement in which states serve as a check when the federal government oversteps its constitutional bounds. In the current lawsuits brought by the states over health care and against the EPA, state governments are pushing back and reasserting federalism as the Founders intended them to do. Indeed, I am not aware of a time in history when this many states have sued the federal government to rein in its power: Today, more than half are parties to lawsuits against the new health care act and its individual health insurance mandate. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Thu Apr, 28 | Share

March - The Not So Dismal Science: Humanitarians v. Economists - William McGurn

Episode Description
THIS EVENING I PROPOSE to take on one of the greatest libels in the English language: the description of economics as ?the dismal science.? I hold a different view?that when it comes to seeing the potential in even the most desperate citizens of this earth, our economists, business leaders, and champions of a commercial republic are often far ahead of our progressives, artists, and humanitarians. And therein lies my tale. Hillsdale College is very much a part of this drama. For ?dismal science? was born as an epithet meant to dismiss those arguing that slaves deserved their freedom. In fact, the first recorded mention of the phrase ?dismal science? occurs in 1849?just five years after Hillsdale was founded. As the dates suggest, both Hillsdale?s founding and the caricature ?dismal science? were not unrelated to a great debate in England that in our nation would be resolved by civil war. Tonight I hope to persuade you that to call economics the ?dismal science? has it exactly backwards?that it is the economists and businessmen who hold the hopeful view of life, and that far from being fundamentally opposed, the admirers of Adam Smith have more in common with the followers of the Good Book than we might suppose. The Anti-Slavery Divide Let?s start with ?dismal science? itself. Even those who know nothing about economics have heard the term. A few might even know that it was Thomas Carlyle who came up with it. Very few know the salient point: Carlyle deployed the term in a magazine polemic entitled ?An Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question.? In that essay, Carlyle savaged the two groups who were leading the British fight against slavery: economists and evangelicals. The latter were sometimes abbreviated to ?Exeter Hall??a reference to the London building that served as the center of British evangelism and philanthropy. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Thu Mar, 31 | Share

January - It's Never Just the Economy, Stupid - Brian T. Kennedy

Episode Description
WE ARE OFTEN TOLD that we possess the most powerful military in the world and that we will face no serious threat for some time to come. We are comforted with three reassurances aimed at deflecting any serious discussion of national security: (1) that Islam is a religion of peace; (2) that we will never go to war with China because our economic interests are intertwined; and (3) that America won the Cold War and Russia is no longer our enemy. But these reassurances are myths, propagated on the right and left alike. We believe them at our peril, because serious threats are already upon us. Let me begin with Islam. We were assured that it was a religion of peace immediately following September 11. President Bush, a good man, believed or was persuaded that true Islam was not that different from Judaism or Christianity. He said in a speech in October 2001, just a month after the attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon: ?Islam is a vibrant faith. . . . We honor its traditions. Our enemy does not. Our enemy doesn?t follow the great traditions of Islam. They?ve hijacked a great religion.? But unfortunately, Mr. Bush was trying to understand Islam as we would like it to be rather than how countless devout Muslims understand it. Organizationally, Islam is built around a belief in God or Allah, but it is equally a political ideology organized around the Koran and the teachings of its founder Muhammad. Whereas Christianity teaches that we should render unto Caesar what is Caesar?s and unto God what is God?s?allowing for a non-theocratic political tradition to develop in the West, culminating in the principles of civil and religious liberty in the American founding?Islam teaches that to disagree with or even reinterpret the Koran?s 6000 odd verses, organized into 114 chapters or Suras and dealing as fully with law and politics as with matters of faith, is punishable by death. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Tue Feb, 15 | Share

October - The Presidency and the Constitution - Mike Pence

Episode Description
THE PRESIDENCY is the most visible thread that runs through the tapestry of the American government. More often than not, for good or for ill, it sets the tone for the other branches and spurs the expectations of the people. Its powers are vast and consequential, its requirements impossible for mortals to fulfill without humility and insistent attention to its purpose as set forth in the Constitution of the United States. Isn?t it amazing, given the great and momentous nature of the office, that those who seek it seldom pause to consider what they are seeking? Rather, unconstrained by principle or reflection, there is a mad rush toward something that, once its powers are seized, the new president can wield as an instrument with which to transform the nation and the people according to his highest aspirations. But, other than in a crisis of the house divided, the presidency is neither fit nor intended to be such an instrument. When it is made that, the country sustains a wound, and cries out justly and indignantly. And what the nation says is the theme of this address. What it says?informed by its long history, impelled by the laws of nature and nature?s God?is that we as a people are not to be ruled and not to be commanded. It says that the president should never forget this; that he has not risen above us, but is merely one of us, chosen by ballot, dismissed after his term, tasked not to transform and work his will upon us, but to bear the weight of decision and to carry out faithfully the design laid down in the Constitution in accordance with the Declaration of Independence. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Sat Oct, 23 | Share

July/Aug - The Tea Parties and the Future of Liberty - Stephen F. Hayes

Episode Description
Barack Obama was inaugurated on January 20, 2009. Within a month he signed a $787 billion ?stimulus package? with virtually no Republican support. It was necessary, we were told, to keep unemployment under eight percent. Overnight, the federal government had, as one of its highest priorities, weatherizing government buildings and housing projects. Streets and highways in no need of repair would be broken up and repaved. The Department of Transportation and other government agencies would spend millions on signs advertising the supposed benefits of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. I saw one of them on Roosevelt Island in Washington, D.C. It boasted that the federal park would be receiving a generous grant to facilitate the involvement of local youth in the removal of ?non-indigenous plants.? In other words, kids would be weeding. We need a sign to announce that? And this was going to save the economy? Then there was American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project number 1R01AA01658001A, a study entitled: ?Malt Liquor and Marijuana: Factors in their Concurrent Versus Separate Use.? I?m not making this up. This is a $400,000 project being directed by a professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The following is from the official abstract: ?We appreciate the opportunity to refocus this application to achieve a single important aim related to our understanding of young adults? use of male [sic] liquor (ML), other alcoholic beverages, and marijuana (MJ), all of which confer high risks for experiencing negative consequences, including addiction. As we have noted, reviews of this grant application have noted numerous strength [sic], which are summarized below.? Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Wed Sep, 1 | Share

May/June - The New New Deal - Charles R. Kesler

Episode Description
In President Obama, conservatives face the most formidable liberal politician in at least a generation. In 2008, he won the presidency with a majority of the popular vote?something a Democrat had not done since Jimmy Carter?s squeaker in 1976?and handily increased the Democrats? control of both houses of Congress. Measured against roughly two centuries worth of presidential victories by Democratic non-incumbents, his win as a percentage of the popular vote comes in third behind FDR?s in 1932 and Andrew Jackson?s in 1828. More importantly, Obama won election not as a status quo liberal, but as an ambitious reformer. Far from being content with incremental gains, he set his sights on major systemic change in health care, energy and environmental policy, taxation, financial regulation, education, and even immigration, all pursued as elements of a grand strategy to ?remake America.? In other words, he longs to be another FDR, building a New New Deal for the 21st century, dictating the politics of his age, and enshrining the Democrats as the new majority party for several decades to come. Suddenly, the era of big government being over is over; and tax-and-spend liberalism is back with a vengeance. We face a $1.4 trillion federal deficit this fiscal year alone and $10-12 trillion in total debt over the coming decade. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Wed Jun, 16 | Share

April - The Coming Constitutional Debate - Stephen Markman

Episode Description
AS ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL under President Ronald Reagan, I prepared a report for Attorney General Edwin Meese entitled ?The Constitution in the Year 2000: Choices Ahead.? This report sought to identify a range of areas in which significant constitutional controversy could be expected over the next 20 years. As critical as I believe those controversies were, they pale in significance before the controversies that will arise over the next several decades. The resolution of these emerging controversies will determine whether the Constitution of 2030 bears any resemblance to the Constitution of 1787?the Framers? Constitution that has guided this nation for most of its first two centuries and has rendered it the freest, most prosperous, and most creative nation in the history of the world. Proponents of a ?21st century constitution? or ?living constitution? aim to transform our nation?s supreme law beyond recognition?and with a minimum of public attention and debate. Indeed, if there is an overarching theme to what they wish to achieve, it is the diminishment of the democratic and representative processes of American government. It is the replacement of a system of republican government, in which the constitution is largely focused upon the architecture of government in order to minimize the likelihood of abuse of power, with a system of judicial government, in which substantive policy outcomes are increasingly determined by federal judges. Rather than merely defining broad rules of the game for the legislative and executive branches of government, the new constitution would compel specific outcomes. Brought to you by OutloudOpinion.com

Imprimis | Tue Apr, 27 | Share

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Today's Green Minute


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Missouri Hockey Puck 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Alternative Signage 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Clean Air Long Life 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Phoenix's Light Rail 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Under Water Robot 5.1.09

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Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Green Venture Capital 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

Cuba Eats Local 5.1.09

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Today's Green Minute - Jim Parks and OutloudOpinion

Jim Parks | Tue May, 19 | Share

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